Experts warn Biden’s response to Monkeypox is ‘slow’

A child affected by monkeypox, sits on his father's legs while receiving treatment at the centre of the International medical NGO Doctors Without Borders (Medecins sans frontieres - MSF), in Zomea Kaka, in the Lobaya region, in the Central African Republic on October 18, 2018. - Monkeypox is a contagious disease, without remedy, which heals itself, but who can kill if not treated in time. Since May 2018, the monkeypox virus, which spreads in tropical Africa, has become a "public health threat" in the Central African Republic, according to the Pasteur Institute of Bangui. (Photo by CHARLES BOUESSEL / AFP) (Photo credit should read CHARLES BOUESSEL/AFP via Getty Images)

A child affected by monkeypox, sits on his father's legs while receiving treatment at the centre of the International medical NGO Doctors Without Borders (Medecins sans frontieres - MSF), in Zomea Kaka, in the Lobaya region, in the Central African Republic on October 18, 2018. - Monkeypox is a contagious disease, without remedy, which heals itself, but who can kill if not treated in time. Since May 2018, the monkeypox virus, which spreads in tropical Africa, has become a "public health threat" in the Central African Republic, according to the Pasteur Institute of Bangui. (Photo by CHARLES BOUESSEL / AFP) (Photo credit should read CHARLES BOUESSEL/AFP via Getty Images)

A child affected by monkeypox, sits on his father’s legs while receiving treatment at the centre of the International medical NGO Doctors Without Borders (Medecins sans frontieres – MSF), in Zomea Kaka, in the Lobaya region, in the Central African Republic on October 18, 2018. (Photo by CHARLES BOUESSEL /AFP via Getty Images)

OAN NEWSROOM
UPDATED 1:13 PM PT – Sunday, July 3, 2022

Health care experts warned that the Monkeypox outbreak in America may get out of control. According to the National Coalition of STD Director’s, the Biden administration’s response to Monkeypox has been bureaucratic and slow.

The group argued that the lack of available vaccines, testing, and therapeutics are what may have allowed the infection to spread during the past month. This comes as the number of Monkeypox cases exceeded 350 as of last week. The WHO has also warned that sustainable transmission of Monkeypox posed a risk to susceptible demographics.

“The virus has now been identified in more than 50 new countries and that trend is likely to continue,” said Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General of the World Health Organization. “I’m concerned about sustained transmission because it would suggest that the virus is establishing itself and it could move into high-risk groups including children, the immunocompromised and pregnant women. We’re starting to see this with several children already infected.”

Meanwhile, European countries have reported more than 4,000 cases of Monkeypox so far. Regional Director for WHO Europe Dr. Hans Kluge claimed that Europe accounts for nearly 90 percent of all confirmed and reported cases worldwide since mid-May.

The Biden administration is planning to roll out a vaccination campaign in the US and it’s currently buying hundreds of thousands of vaccine doses.

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